Category Page: Assessment Reports

Regional Policy Review on Paediatric and Adolescent HIV Care

The global community has set the goal of ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030. Recent data from UNAIDS postulate that only half of treatment-eligible children living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa are likely to receive antiretroviral therapy compared with HIV-positive adults. As compared to adults, adolescents are experiencing poorer outcomes , higher rates of mortality, loss to follow up and lower rates of virological suppression. . Adolescents are the only age group in which AIDS-related deaths increased., The annual number of AIDS-related deaths among adolescents almost doubled between 2005 and 2012. Non-existent and inconsistent policies are some of the reasons that have prevented national and subnational governments in sub-Saharan Africa from explicitly programming for children and adolescents living with HIV.

ANECCA received a grant from the Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) to implement the “Catalysing access to quality services for children and adolescents living with HIV” regional project to address issues that impede optimal coverage and quality of care. The project aims to remove policy bottlenecks, build capacity, and ensure access to appropriate information and services related to HIV testing, care and treatment for children and adolescents in seven countries.

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Assessment of Training Needs and Mentorship approaches of Healthcare workers involved in children and Adolescent HIV Services in Ethiopia

Background: In 2016 there were an estimated 748,933 people living with HIV including 78,834 children in Ethiopia. The total estimated new HIV infections were 21, 565. Out of these 2,212 were children below 15 years of age. The adult ART coverage by the end of 2015 was 61.6% and 27.3% for children. New HIV infections among young adults (15-24 years) have been on.

The increase, with Ethiopia contributing 10% of the estimated 120,000 adolescent HIV related deaths globally. This is the highest from any single country, and a re Section of the gap in the provision of quality adolescent HIV services.

As part of a regional effort to address poor coverage of quality HIV services for children and adolescents, the African Network for the Care of Children Affected by HIV/AIDS (ANECCA) initiated a regional project aimed at improving the coverage and quality of HIV care, treatment and support for children and adolescents living with HIV in seven sub-Saharan African countries including Ethiopia. This report presents the findings of one of the components of this project – the assessment of the training needs and mentorship approaches among health care workers caring for children and adolescents living with HIV.

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Assessment of Training Needs and Mentorship Approaches for Children and Adolescent HIV Services in South Sudan

HIV is a global public health threat and a major burden nations. The Republic of South Sudan is part of global task force to ght HIV and AIDS. South Sudan has witnessed the effects and impact of the disease on her people. Two of these effects are stigma and discrimination, both self and enacted stigma, among all communities and social classes.

Children and adolescents are among the affected and are at high risk. Health workers have limited knowledge of paediatric HIV, tuberculosis and other sexually transmitted infections. Access to treatment is poor and many clients lack information
on care and treatment. Although strides have been made in adult HIV care, healthcare providers still lack the required competencies to offer quality care to children and adolescents. This situation therefore leaves glaring gaps in South Sudan to attain the UNAIDS global strategy of 90–90–90 by 2020.

ANECCA received a grant from the Global Fund to ght AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria to implement a regional project “Catalysing access to quality services for children and adolescents living with HIV.” This regional project provides a unique opportunity to capitalise on paediatric and adolescent expertise across the continent to address disparities in access to care and treatment for children and adolescents.

ANECCA is the first NGO to carry out a broad study looking for gaps in children and adolescents accessing HIV management in South Sudan. The study was carried out in 10 facilities that provide comprehensive HIV care and treatment in 10 states.

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Assessment of Training Needs and Mentorship approaches for Child and Adolescent HIV services in Uganda

HIV/AIDS services in many countries
are structured to provide care for adults, with children and adolescents not being adequately catered for. In fact, the antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage among HIV-infected children under 15years worldwide, majority of whom
are in Sub-Saharan Africa, by end of 2015 was 51%. In Uganda, 63% of HIV- infected children under 15years were
on ART, implying that 37% were yet to start treatment, in 2015. Considering
this sub optimal ART coverage, the African Network for the Care of Children Affected by HIV/AIDS (ANECCA), with
a grant from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM), initiated a project in early 2016, in 7 countries including Uganda, to try and bridge the gap.

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Assessment of Policy Gaps for Children and Adolescent HIV Services in South Sudan

The world currently holds the largest generation of young people in history:

1.8 billion adolescents and youth make up one quarter of the world’s population.

Fulling young people’s right to health care can create a powerful force for economic development and positive change in South Sudan.

This rapid assessment of gaps and strengths in HIV policies and guidelines in South Sudan is part of a seven-country grant from the Global Fund to fight AIDS Tuberculosis and Malaria implemented by the African Network for Care of Chil- dren Affected by HIV/AIDS (ANNECA to improve coverage of quality services for children and adolescents living with HIV. The study aimed to review and assess existing national paediatric and adolescent HIV policies and guidelines in South Sudan to identify strengths and gaps in provision of quality services for children and adolescents living with HIV; to docu- ment best practices and opportunities within national policy frameworks strategies and guidelines in the provision of quality services for children and adolescents living with HIV in South Sudan; and to make recommendations that inform the development of national plans to promote the adoption and implementation of policies that increase coverage and quality of paediatric and adolescent HIV care treatment and support.

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Assessment of Policy Gaps for Children and Adolescent HIV services in Malawi

Background: Survival chances of people living with HIV have signicantly improved world over and in Malawi, largely due to the use of potent anti-retroviral drugs with reduced toxicity. As of June 2015, 15.8 million people around the world were receiving Antiretroviral Therapy (ART), with sub-Saharan Africa contributing approximately 11 million. While there has been remarkable increase in coverage
of ART for both adults and children, the coverage for children and adolescents has continued to lag behind that of adults. This is true for Malawi as well as evidenced by the phenomenon that as of September 2015, only half (50%) of the children under 15 years of age eligible for ART were on treatment relative to more than …

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